Ancient Roman paintings from Pompeii, Herculaneum and Stabiae


  P.2071 - §7 The influence of Greek culture had already penetrated the lands of the western Mediterranean when Alexander spread Hellenistic civilization over the near-Eastern world. The Greeks did very well with their religion and their politics as long as they lived in small city-states, but when the Macedonian king dared to expand Greece into an empire, stretching from the Adriatic to the Indus, trouble began. The art and philosophy of Greece were fully equal to the task of imperial expansion, but not so with Greek political administration or religion. After the city-states of Greece had expanded into empire, their rather parochial gods seemed a little queer. The Greeks were really searching for one God, a greater and better God, when the Christianized version of the older Jewish religion came to them.
 

These paintings are from three cities which were buried totally or partially by the eruption of mount Vesuvius in AD 79.

These paintings often depict the Greek gods and heroes in the Greek myth.

Descriptions are in English or Italian.

The numerous, identical replicas of the scene of Perseus freeing Andromeda indicate the popularity of that subject, since the first half of the first century AD.

The picture of Artemis, and sitting with the crown radiate, facing Kallisto, the most beautiful of the nymphs of his entourage, which will be Transformed in the constellation Ursa Major, has an identical replica in the framework still in situ in Pompeii in the House of the tragic Poet.

House of the Surgeon, Pompeii

Painter with painted statue and framed painting from a fresco in Pompeii. Now in the Museo Archeologico in Naples.

Pelias, king of Iolcos, stops on the steps of a temple as he recognises young Jason by his missing sandal.

Pompeii, Pan e Ninfe.

Pompeii, Europa sul toro.

Pompeii, Ercole e il centauro Nesso.

Pompeii, Menade e amorino

Pompeii, Ifigenia in Tauride

Supplizio di Direce, Pompeii

Drunken Hercules clad in a female dress near an altar as Omphale looks on.

Mars seduces Venus in the presence of Eros and a maid.

Eros brought by Peitho (Persuasion) to Venus as Anteros laughts at his being punished for having chosen the wrong target.

Medea medita l'uccisione dei figli.

Medea plans the murder of her children, who are playing knucklebones.

Pompeii, Perseo e Andromeda

Pompeii, Arianna abbandonata.

Ariadne weeping as Revenge points towards Theseus's ship.

Pompeii, Io e Argo

Io wearing bovine horns watched over by Argos on Hera's orders.

  Marte e Venere, Pompeii

Dionysos finds Ariadne with the help of two Cupids.

Epifania di Dioniso, Museo archeologico nazionale di Napoli, (inv. nr. 9278). Da Pompei, Casa dei Capitelli Colorati (VII, 4, 51-31, oecus 24). Arianna, figlia di Minosse, abbandonata da Teseo, è sprofondata nel sonno per il dolore, mentre Dioniso sopraggiunge per consolarla.

Achille e Breiseide, Pompeii

Achilles' surrender of Briseis

Elena sulla nave di Paride, Pompeii.

Embarcation of Helen on Paris's ship.

Sacrificio di Ifigenia.

Iphigeneia carried to the sacrifice (centre) while the seer Calchas (on the right) watches on and Agamemnon (on the left) covers his head in sign of deploration. In the sky, Artemis appears with a hind which will be substituted to the young girl.

Admetus and Alcestis.

Pompeii, Venere e Marte

Pompeii, Teseo ha ucciso il Minotauro.

Pompeii, Espero tra Apollo e Venere

 Pompeii, Piritoo e Ippodamia.
 
Sappho of Pompeii. La cosiddetta Saffo.
 Perseus and Andromeda.

Giovane con rotolo, da Pompei, VI Insula Occidentalis - Museo archeologico nazionale di Napoli (inv. nr. 9085).

Pompeii, Zuffa nell'Anfiteatro.

Busto maschile, da Ercolano - Museo archeologico nazionale di Napoli (inv. nr. 9072).

House of the Citharist, Pompeii

Nereide su cavallo marino, Museo archeologico nazionale di Napoli (inv. nr. 8859), da Stabiae, Villa di Arianna, anticamera.

Stabiae, Discobolo.

Discobolo, Museo archeologico nazionale di Napoli (inv. nr. 9053), da Stabiae, Villa di Arianna, anticamera.

Nereide su pantera, Museo archeologico nazionale di Napoli (inv. nr. 8870), da Stabiae, Villa di Arianna, anticamera.

Giovane seduto, Museo archeologico nazionale di Napoli (inv. nr. 9093), da Stabiae, Villa di Arianna, triclinio 7.

Stabiae, Vecchio seduto.

Vecchio seduto, Museo archeologico nazionale di Napoli (inv. nr. 9142), da Stabiae, Villa di Arianna, triclinio 7.

Fresco of Flora or Primavera, from Stabiae, one of the most famous paintings of the Roman era. Found at Stabia, is now in the National Archaeological Museum of Naples (inv. nr. 8834).

Stabiae, Leda il cigno.

Affresco (cm 44 x 32) raffigurante Leda, proveniente da Villa Arianna a Stabia (cubicolo W 26) e conservato al Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli (inv. 9546).

Stabiae, Medea.

Affresco (cm 38 x 26) raffigurante Medea, proveniente da Villa Arianna a Stabia (cubicolo W 26) e conservato al Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli (inv. 8978).

Stabiae, Diana

Aeneas treated by Iapyx.

Pompeii, Dioscruo.

Piece of a fresco depicting the Dioscure and a horse – Pompeii – “House of the Dioscuri”, Archaeological museum of Naples, Italy (inv. nr. 9453).

 see above
 Marte e Venere.