Tree of Life around the Second Garden


There are at least four likely regions where the legends of the tree of life may have survived.

1. Lake Van or Mount Ararat/Urartu

Leaves and fruit of the tree of life were used by Van and his associates, as well as by Adam and Eve. One would expect something about Van and the tree of life would survive as a legend in the region Van traveled or lived, especially near the Lake Van. Vanite ancestors of the Assyrians also believed that Van and Amadon were taken alive from the planet while they went up to mount Ararat. Thus, we should look for clues of traditions of the tree of life around Lake Van or Mount Ararat. This region includes Anatolia (now Turkey), even highlands of India.

2. Crete and Cyprus

The tribes that had some interaction with the First Eden residents may have retained some tradition of the tree of life. If the First Eden was a fingerlike peninsula attached to the eastern Mediterranean coast of Israel or Lebanon, residents in this region may have some tradition about the tree, as well noted in the Genesis, but due to their taboo, they may not have left any graven images.

The Vanite division of the northern Nodites migrated to Crete. Thus, Cretans should have kept the tradition of the tree of life. Also, Cyprus was probably the island closest to the First Eden. Cretans and Cypriots would have traded much due to proximity.

3. Second Eden

After Adam and Eve moved to the Second Eden, the people who interacted with them may never have seen the tree of life, but they may have heard about it. The Second Eden is trapped between Euphrates and Tigris where the two rivers become narrowest. Adam and Even lived in this region much longer than in the First Eden. This aspect reinforces Mesopotamia as the most likely region with ancient human records of the tree of lifee. Also, Vanite ancestors of the Assyrians taught them about Van, and they should have kept the tradition of the tree of life.

4. Persian Gulf

The tree of life was originally planted in Dalamatia, which submerged and reemerged later. Thus, the reisidents of the Persial Gulf may have kept the tradition of the tree of life. However, unless diluted by later interaction with Assyrians, their tradition of the tree of life may not hint anything about the Adamic default.

Note that the tree of life was not planted in the Second Eden. The Urantia Book does not mention the flowers of the tree of life. Since it bears fruits, it was most likely a blooming tree. Sumerians, Assyrians, Cretans and Cypriots had a long tradition of the tree of life and its rosettes.

This page collects ancient human sources of the tree of life in three regions: (1) Lake Van and Mount Ararat, (2) Crete and Cyprus, (3) Second Eden, and (4) Persian Gulf.

Note that the tree of life was not planted in the Second Eden. The Urantia Book does not mention the flowers of the tree of life. Since it bears fruits, it was most likely a blooming tree. Sumerians, Assyrians and Cypriots had a long tradition of the tree of life and its rosettes.

Tree of Life in Crete and Cyprus
Rosettes of the Tree of Life in Crete and Cyprus

Tree of Life around the Second Garden
Rosettes of the Tree of Life around the Second Garden

Tree of Life around Lake Van and Mount Ararat
Rosettes of the Tree of Life around Lake Van and Mount Ararat

Tree of Life in Persia
Rosettes of the Tree of Life in Persia

 

Tree of Life in the neighborhood of the Second Garden

Note the rosette of the tree of life behind the guardian.

 

Note the tree of life between the two guardians.

Note the rosette of the tree of life.

The guardian is picking the fruit of the tree of life.

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The presence of a snake suggests that the Assyrians/Sumerians were aware of the legend of the tree of life and Adam and Eve. Although experts deny it now, the two persons may well have been 'Adam and Eve. Also, the deified person with a special headdress could have been Van, and the person on the left Adam. The scene may represent the banquet before Van's departure. Or they may be both women.

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The two reliefs show pine or fir cone shaped fruits of the tree of life and flowers (rosette). Notice the rosettes on both arms of protective spirits (midwayers). The rosettes are the flowers of the tree of life.

Ashurnasipal II was the king of Assyria from 884-859 BC. Assyrians maintained the tradition of the tree of life and midwayers. Immediately after the rebellion, three loyal midwaers assumed the custody of the tree of life (756, §6)


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Each protective spirit (midwayer) has a rosette on each wrist.

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Pergammon Museum, Berlin

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On the second panel, the tree of life is in the center, and midwayers pick the fruits.

a The tree of life and rosette design is common in Assyrian alabaster reliefs. Assyrians used to live in the northern part of the Euphrates-Tigris plain.

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Boston Museum of Fine Arts

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What are protective spirits or deities? Midwayers assumed the custodian of the tree of life after the planetary rebellion.
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British Museum

A Midwayer guarding the tree of life.


Two female protective spirits guard the tree of life. The archangel custodian warned Eve of losing access to the tree of life in case of a default. However, secondary midwayers are differentiated along the lines of maleness and femaleness, and often spoken of "he" and "she." (p. 864, §4)

 

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tree tree
ashurnasirpal ashurnasirpal
tree tree

The palace of Mschatta, Jordan.

Note the tree of life in each colum. Rosetts are also depicted in between.

Sacred tree (tree of life)